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-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television sion >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' head quarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is wi
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
unbelievable, this happening at once. historic moment with the vast uncertainties. >>> coming up, in japan, a frightening forecast for one of those damaged nuclear reactors. we'll go live to tokyo. >>> frightening news out of japan as it appears the nuclear core reactor number three may be leaking radioactive material. workers near the reactor detected radiation 10,000 times stronger than normal. savidge is in tokyo. what are you hearing? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, as you point out, the government greatly concerned about the, is that may be going on at reactor number three. we've got an image to show you. it's a graphic. basically here's the problem -- they think that the water levels with the radiation they found, 10,000 times, as you say, above normal in the case that this is perhaps a leak coming from the core of the reactor. that particular reactor of all six that are out there is the most dangerous because it has mixed fuel. it's the only one that does. a mixture of uranium and plutonium, that's very dangerous stuff. meanwhile, overnight, though, the government also said yo
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
of the disaster in japan. this is another day of setbacks at the troubles fukushima plachblt a high radiation reading sparked another reaction. officials, however, say this was all a mistake. nbc's charles hadlock is joining us from nearby seoul with the last. they were off by a couple of zeros but obviously this is not comfortable forring in northbound in that region, charles. >> reporter: no, it's not. just a few away and then you have this problem. what happened today, a worker at the plant looked at his gauge and it said that the radiation level was 10 million times higher than normal. an immediate evacuation of the workers was called for and later tokyo electric officials said that was a miscalculation that the radiation level was not that high. in fact, they say now that the radiation level is knew about 100,000 times more than normal, certainly less than what was reported earlier. but also very high. and that's the problem. there's radiated water on that site. the problem is what to do with it. how do you get it out of there, and do you work around it. that's what they're trying to fig
in japan. workers get another scare as smoke rises, once again, from that crippled nuclear plant and residents are now being warned about contaminated drinking water and food. this as the estimated death toll jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, march 21st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a monday morning, i'm chris wragge. >> i'm erica hill. >> following two very major stories this morning. first of which the situation in japan. all eyes on that nuclear facility in fukushima once again. this as reports as i mention a few moments ago, smoke emanating from that troubled reactor 3 there. and now reports of radiation levels detected radiation levels in both the food and the water in that safety zone around the nuclear plant right now. we're going to continue to follow this and have an update on the situation there in the coming moments. >> you mentioned two major stories. the other one, of course, that we are following is happening in libya. for a second
? >>> japan's radiation fears. a run on water and basic supplies in tokyo and at the crippled nuclear plant, workers sent to the hospital from exposure to beta rays. >>> and washington, we have a problem. the strange case of two ssenger jets forc to lan on ei oat d.c. mor rpt when no one answered at air traffic control. we'll have the latest on the investigation, just ahead. >>> good morning, everyone. it's thursday, march 24th, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. chuck todd will be back tomorrow. also this morning, the president getting it from the right and the left in congress on libya, as he wakes up this morning back in washington. and we will talk to the libyan ambassador to the u.s., who left the gadhafi regime live here on "the daily rundown" later this hour. >>> also, the slow start to the 2012 republican race seems to be helping one candidate -- president obama. we'll have the latest poll. >>> but let's get to the rundown. and we'll start in libya, where a more complicated and potentially more dangerous phase of the military effort has begun. coalition war planes are now attacking gadhafi
in the show. again, she is dead at the age of 79. >>> want to turn now to the latest from japan, where a spike in radiation levels in tokyo's water supply has residents there on edge. we're joined by nbc news' chief science correspondent in tokyo, robert bazell. good to see you. we know the usda has put a hold on japanese imports into the u.s. on the wake of the radiation news. what are the big concerns there? >> reporter: well, here, willie, the concern is the water supply. there's a lot of concerns, of course, but the immediate concern in tokyo is the water supply as you mentioned. you can see here it's raining. and it's been raining heavily for days now, and what that rain does is it takes whatever's being released from the plant, the crippled nuclear plant, north of here, and drives it into the ground which drives it into the ground water. what happened today was the officials at the main water purification plant here discovered that radioactive iodine levels were twice as high as they should be for infants. they are still in the range considered safe for adults, but they advised parents t
so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> and when we come back, radiation fears in japan. a tap water warning issues for infants in tokyo. >>> and the world loses a lenl jend. we look at the life of dame elizabeth taylor as colorful off screen as it was on. homeowners -- rates have been going up, but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once
in the battle to prevent radiation from leaking from the nuclear reactor in japan. the news comes just a day after safety officials say they suspect a dangerous breach in the core of one reactor. workers are now switching to fresh water as they try to cool the reactors. they say the salty sea water they were using before could cause corrosion and clog up pipes. barges are helping to bring in more fresh water. and new numbers on the extent of the tragedy. the official death toll has surpassed 10,000 with 17,000 people who remain missing. nbc's lee cowen is live for us in tokyo. what are officials say about the high radiation levels detected in the sea waters near the plant? that has to be cause for concern. >> it is, alex. it's still below levels they say are harmful, but it's the second time the radiation levels have spiked and this time it's more than 1,000 times what it should be. that's going to spark monitoring systems along the coastline far more than the systems that are already in place. the higher than normal concentration of iodine in sea water is the latest worry for those struggli
're goin to oo mend right now we're kind of one to one. japan is two times the amount of debt compared to how much they make every year. is that how far we can go? >> i don't think we're going to get anywhere near that. and one way of thinking about this is, in terms of a company's balance sheet, on one side you have what you owe. the other side are your assets. if you were a company and you had a lot of good projects, okay, investments 20%, 30%, i'll lend you money at close to zero interest rate, you would be foolish not to do it. because it's exactly by investing that you're going to grow and become a big company. noup there's another point that i try to raise, in the article that i wrote, which is there are lots of ways we can get. we spend literally billions and billions on weapons that don't work. >> and their suggestion is that we should cut some of those back? >> and those don't improve the balance sheet. they create a liability. but they don't create an asset. we can have more security with less spending. >> all righty. of course there's the factors of political will behind all
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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